Monthly Archives: April 2014

The wisdom of Churchill

Advertisements

Delusional Effectiveness Disorder: Confusing Activity with Achievement

The Character of Leadership

De-lu-sion-al  Ef-fec-tive-ness  Dis-or-der

Pronunciation: di-‘lüzh-nəl ĭ-fěk’tĭv-nes dĭs-ôr’dər

–noun

  1. a functional disorder characterized by systematized delusions of accomplishment and the projection of personal achievement, which are ascribed to the span and intensity of activity demonstrated, and manifested in the notable absence of meaningful results.
  2. delusions of grandeur
  3. slang: rectal-cranial inversion

Mission AccomplishedWe’ve all seen them.  Companies and organizations around the country are full of them.  You know who I’m talking about – you have a few in your organization right now.  I’m referring to those people who make the most noise, ask the most questions, make the most suggestions, send the most email – unrepentant self-promoters who frantically wave their banner to demonstrate to the world how busy and important they are and how tirelessly they work.  They make a big fuss and put on a great show, but actually accomplish very little.  In short, these are folks who confuse activity with…

View original post 771 more words

3 Questions Every Employee Wants Answered

The Character of Leadership

Compass-And-Old-MapManagement consultants and organizational trainers love building models. There is something very appealing about organizing ideas and strategies to implement a particular vision or objective, especially when managing change. Companies constantly look for ways to make training more meaningful, to cultivate environments in which employees are engaged in their jobs and aligned with the vision. Yet, despite all the development models, performance factors, and evolving priorities, employees ultimately just want the answers to three simple questions:

1. Where are we going?
2. How are we going to get there?
3. What is my role?

Where are we going?

Communicating a clear vision and well-defined objective is essential.  Employees need to know what success will look like.  The answer to this question should define the goal and paint a picture of the future.

How are we going to get there?

Providing a destination without specific directions for how to get there…

View original post 71 more words